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June: Building Your Romance Library


I am working to curate the ideal 100 books every romance reader, writer, or library should possess. Feel free to shoot me an email if you can think of a must-read, in classic literature, as well as a gotta-have series for any bookshelf.



Samiah Brooks never thought she would be "that" girl. But a live tweet of a horrific date just revealed the painful truth: she's been catfished by a three-timing jerk of a boyfriend. Suddenly Samiah -- along with his two other "girlfriends," London and Taylor -- have gone viral online. Now the three new besties are making a pact to spend the next six months investing in themselves. No men and no dating. For once Samiah is putting herself first, and that includes finally developing the app she's always dreamed of creating. Which is the exact moment she meets the deliciously sexy Daniel Collins at work. What are the chances? But is Daniel really boyfriend material or is he maybe just a little too good to be true? "A smart, funny digital-age romance about real women living in the real world. Couldn't put it down!" --Abby Jimenez, USA Today bestselling author of The Happy Ever After Playlist.

The re-issue of a remarkable first novel by a young, gay, black author who fashioned a deeply moving and compelling coming of age story out of the highly controversial issues of bisexuality and AIDS.


Law school, girlfriends, and career choices were all part of Raymond Tyler's life, but there were other, more terrifying issues for him to confront. Being black was tough enough, but Raymond was becoming more and more conscious of sexual feelings that he knew weren't "right." He was completely committed to Sela, his longtime girlfriend, but his attraction to Kelvin, whom he had met during his last year in law school, had become more than just a friendship.


Fleeing to New York to escape both Sela and Kelvin, Raymond finds himself more confused than ever before. New relationships--both male and female--give him enormous pleasure but keep him from finding the inner peace and lasting love he so desperately desires. The horrible illness and death of a friend eventually force Raymond, at last, to face the truth.


Helping pack up his childhood home was going much easier than Amir expected. The only sticking point is the record collection his father Alonzo refuses to put in storage. When Amir asked his father why he needs to keep all those records with him, Alonzo offers to tell him a story instead.

--

Monterey Pop Festival


In 1967, Alonzo was a baby music reporter at the Village Voice on his first big assignment. By his side is photographer Ada Carr who is all brown skin, big afro and sharp tongue. He should be worried about his story, but all he can think about is the way Ada looks dancing to the music in the dusk, the stage lights illuminating her form. He knows love when he sees, or better yet hears, it.


Over the course of two weekends, over forty years apart, Alonzo imparts a soundtrack of love and life to Amir that bridges the past and present and they both learn how to say goodbye.


Content Warnings:

Parental death

Grief

Recreational drug use


If you need to keep up with all of these wonderful reads, then I've got you.

I created this journal for you to make a list of the books and series you’ve read. This is a neat, tidy, purse-sized notebook that allows you to collect autographs, make a reading list, and check off books you’ve read, or have not read.

Index Page: Use this page to record books and the page number where you can find the review.

Daily Reading Tracker: It’s just plain fun to color in boxes. You can color in the boxes on the days that you read, or listen to an audiobook.

Book Review Pages: Make notes on characters, plots storylines, and settings.

Autograph Page: Print out those author photos and scrapbook them here along with autographs, tickets, flyers and more.. Get it here.



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2 commenti


Alice Yanes
Alice Yanes
02 giu 2023

This is a book that had me all in my feelings when reading and listening to it. So I suggest Before I Let Go by Kennedy Ryan.

Mi piace

Sounds good to me.

Mi piace
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